Excursion to the Llama Temple

Our visit to the Llama Temple fell on a brisk, bright day. Beijing has a habit of short-lived rainstorms, and while the rain brings about complaints along with a wild rush of street vendors trying to sell an umbrella to the unfortunate commuter, I love it when I wake up to a rainy day. Not only does it make me feel more at home (Seattle’s often harsh characterization as a city built beneath constant cloud cover and drizzle (drizzle in Chinese: 毛毛雨,  pronounced máo máo yǔ) is a well-deserved one), but rainstorms send the smog running in Beijing. The days following rain showers are always bright, clear, and beautiful. So, bright and beautiful, albeit bitter, bitter cold – we embarked on the subway to the Llama Temple.

It was a very small group of us touring the Lllama Temple, which I found fantastic because it allowed each of us more time to work on our Chinese and ask as many questions as we could. Zoe brought along a list of common phrases in Buddhism and their English translations – not only profound and wise suggestions for a peaceful, enlightened life, most of them were lyrically beautiful as well.

The cold hadn’t scared away any visitors. The temple was awash with the potent smell of incense – it was calming to stroll throughout the many courtyards with incense burning all around as people prayed. We were also quite lucky with our timing; a group of new monks was practicing chanting in one of the halls, and so we crowded in with other guests to listen to the harmony of their voices rising and falling as one.

The spiritual and historical nature of the Llama Temple was one that I found enchanting. It was an absolutely beautiful site to visit, and I plan to return before I leave Beijing.

Here are some of the phrases we learned:

知足常乐

zhīzú cháng lè

Happy is he who is content.

 

助人为乐

zhùrén weílè

take pleasure in helping people

 

有缘千里来相会 无缘对面不相识

yǒu yuán qiān lǐ lái xiāng huì wúyuán duìmiàn bù xiāng shi

Fate brings us together even we are thousand miles apart; but if we are not destined to meet, though we are face to face, we may not be acquainted with each other.

 

 

 

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